Coming soon
Meet Yodatai! The World’s First Digital Data Assistant. Learn more and get your early invite now!
Go
An error occured. Details Hide
You have unsaved pages. Restore Cancel
All datasets:  C F N
  • C
    • November 2012
      Source: Freedom House
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 December, 2012
      Select Dataset
      Countries at the Crossroads is an annual analysis of government performance in 70 strategically important countries worldwide that are at a critical crossroads in determining their political future. The in-depth comparative assessments and quantitative ratings – examining government accountability, civil liberties, rule of law, and anticorruption and transparency efforts – are intended to help international policymakers identify areas of progress, as well as to highlight areas of concern that could be addressed in diplomatic efforts and reform assistance.The Crossroads project has generated far-reaching interest since its inception in 2004. Increased attention to the relationship between competent governance and respect for civil and political rights means that scholars and policymakers require sophisticated tools to help place the performance of various governments in perspective. Crossroads helps ground this analysis by providing indispensable quantitative assessment that allows for comparison over time, as well as detailed narrative reports that provide real-world context.A new edition of Crossroads is published each year, with half the set of countries analyzed in odd years and the other half in even years. Crossroads reports are written and evaluated by some of the most prominent independent experts available for each country.
  • F
    • January 2017
      Source: Freedom House
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Freedom in the World is Freedom House’s flagship annual report, assessing the condition of political rights and civil liberties around the world. It is composed of numerical ratings and supporting descriptive texts for 195 countries and 15 territories. Freedom in the World has been published since 1973, allowing Freedom House to track global trends in freedom over more than 40 years. It has become the most widely read and cited report of its kind, used on a regular basis by policymakers, journalists, academics, activists, and many others.
  • N
    • June 2016
      Source: Freedom House
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 June, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Note: The ratings are based on a scale of 1 to 7, with 1 representing the highest level of democratic progress and 7 the lowest. Nations in Transit is Freedom House’s research project on democracy in the 29 formerly communist countries from Central Europe to Central Asia. The flagship of the project is an annual survey of democratic reform that has been published since 1995, and with the same methodology since 2003. Nations in Transit also publishes briefs on topics relevant to democratic reform in the region. The Nations in Transit annual report researchers score the countries on a scale of 1 to 7 in seven categories: National Democratic Governance, Local Democratic Governance, Electoral Process, Independent Media, Civil Society, Judicial Framework and Independence, and Corruption. Category scores are based on a detailed list of questions available here. These category scores are straight-averaged to create a country’s “Democracy Score” on a scale of 1 to 7, with 1 being the most democratic, and 7 the least. Freedom House contracts independent researchers from academia, journalism, and civil society for each country to draft the country reports and make the initial scoring. These draft country reports and score proposals are sent to between three and six reviewers per country per year for comments. After researchers have a chance to respond to the comments, Nations in Transit and its advisors meet to finalize scores for each country. Where possible, scores reflect the consensus of researchers, reviewers, advisors, and Freedom House, but Freedom House has the final vote on all score changes. The annual report is currently funded through a grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). USAID has no say in the methodology or conclusions of the report.