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Millenials have overtaken Babyboomers by nearly 4 million to become the largest generation in the United States. With a current population of around 79 million, the Millenial generation is expected to grow to 81 million over the next 20 years because of migration, according to the US Census Bureau's latest estimates.

The boundaries that define generations are not universally agreed, and yet these boundaries carry important implications in business and government. The size, financial security, and general health of each generation shapes everything from marketing campaigns to insurance and social welfare benefits to transportation and health services planning. 

  • According to the Pew Research Center, the oldest Millenial was born in 1981 while the youngest was born in 1997.
  • Synchrony Financial uses much lower boundaries, defining the Millenial generation as those born from 1976 through 1992.
  • Considering still other definitions, the birth year of the oldest Millenial varies from 1976 to 1986 while the birth year of the youngest ranges from 1993 to 2010.

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Wonder what is your State Population, How many Male/Female in your State? Hover to the map to check.

Demography statistics by key indicators: GDP per capita