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The top and bottom tiers of the Economist Intelligence Unit’s liveability ranking of global cities are little changed from last year, with only Sydney moving out of the top 10 most liveable cities, giving way to Hamburg. Under the EIU methodology, middle sized wealthy cities with low population densities were still more likely to appear among the top rated global cities. The cost of living was the most common drawback for some otherwise well-performing cities. Lower performers struggled with escalating terrorism, social unrest, and other hostilities common now to cities such as Damascus, Lagos, Tripoli, and Kiev.

In the 2016 ranking, heightened terrorism globally in its various forms weighed down the scores for strong performers more than in years past. Terrorist attacks in European countries and the combined mass and police shootings in the United States, for example, lowered the livability scores of cities in these countries. Detroit and Paris were among the most negatively changed rankings of 2016.

The Liveability Index is composed of composite and individual factor scores for 140 cities worldwide. Relative comfort is assessed for 30 factors across five categories: stability, culture & environment, healthcare, infrastructure, and education. The overall score varies from 1 to 100, intolerable to ideal living conditions.

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Global Cities Index, 2014

Bloomberg ranked global cities based on the A.T. Kearney Global Cities Index score. Cities were scored on a scale of zero to 100 according to 26 metrics in five dimensions: business activity, human capital, information exchange, cultural experience and political engagement. In 2014 New York kept the first place by the overall score and in the business activity ranking. Fast-growing Asian megacities: Bejing, Shanghai, Singapore - improved their positions.  Source: Global Cities Index, 2014 For the methodology of the sub-indices see the bottom of the page

EIU Worldwide Cost of Living Report 2016

The Worldwide Cost of Living (WCOL) is a twice-yearly Economist Intelligence Unit survey that compares more than 400 individual prices across 160 products and services. These include food, drink, clothing, household supplies and personal care items, home rents, transport, utility bills, private schools, domestic help and recreational costs. The survey designed to help human resources and finance managers calculate cost-of-living allowances and build compensation packages for expatriates and business travelers. The survey incorporates easy-to-understand comparative cost-of-living indices between cities. The most expensive city in the world...

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