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The oil price has fallen by more than 30% since Summer 2014. This affected everyone from producers to consumers. The visualization represents Oil Price Dynamics, Breakeven Oil Price which shows oil prices needed to meet general government expenditure and Marginal Cost of Oil Production which shows the change in total cost of producing one additional barrel of oil.
World oil price at $55-$60 / barrel exceeds the cost of Russian Arctic oil production, Europe and Brazil biofuels production, shale and tight oil production in US and Canada and offshore oil extraction in Brazil.
State budgets of oil-producing countries will suffer from oil price decrease if the market price falls below breakeven price. In Dec. 2014 world oil prices fell lower than necessary for almost all oil exporters in order to balance their government expenditures.  

The data comes from IMFDeutsche BankCiti Research and Reuters

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